Wrap Around Care and Right to Choose

A lovely NYT article by Jessica Nutik Zitter, headed Should I Help My Patients Die? gives a whole new, to me at least, perspective on the relationship between comprehensive care and end of life choice.  As a palliative care doctor in  state that allows, with multiple protections, assistance in the end of life process, she tells of this referral:

This first patient of mine was not a simple case. When I walked into his room, he glared at me. “Are you here to help me with this aid-in-dying thing?” he asked. He was in his early 60s, thin and tired, but in no obvious distress. From my read of his chart, he met all criteria to qualify. Terminal illness, decision-making capacity, ability to self-administer the medications. And he had made the requisite first request for the drugs two weeks earlier, as procedure dictates.

When I asked why he wanted to end his life early, he shrugged. “I’m just sick of living.” I asked about any symptoms that might lie behind his request: unrelenting pain, nausea, shortness of breath. He denied them all. In palliative care, we are taught that suffering can take many forms besides the physical. I probed further and the floodgates opened.

He felt abandoned by his sister. She cared only about his Social Security payments, he said, and had gone AWOL now that the checks were being mailed to her house. Their love-hate relationship spanned decades, and they were now on the outs. His despair had given way to rage.

“Let’s just end this,” he said. “I’m fed up with my lousy life.” He really didn’t care, he added, that his sister opposed his decision.

His request appeared to stem from a deep family wound, not his terminal illness. I felt he wanted to punish his sister, and he had found a way to do it.

At our second meeting, with more trust established, he issued a sob, almost a keening. He felt terrified and powerless, he said. He didn’t want to live this way anymore.

I understood. I could imagine my own distress in his condition — being shuttled like a bag of bones between the nursing home and the hospital. It was his legal right to request this intervention from me. But given how uncomfortable I was feeling, was it my right to say no?

In the end, the patient agrees to try an anti-depressant, and dies three moths later in a nursing home.

But the real reasons for the patient’s despair are not medical, not pain, but psychosocial and emotional, with strong legal and financial elements.  These were needs that the system, notwithstanding our growing understanding of the need for multi-faceted comprehensive care, is just not yet able to provide.

This leads me to want to put the question much more starkly:

Do we have the right to force people so stay alive when we are unable to give them what thy need to have hope and meaning in their lives?

In terms of our understanding what the above described patient needs, take a look at this graphic from the recent NQF document, Strategies for Change – A Collaborative Journey to Transform Advanced Illness Care

advanced-illness-care-graphic-1016-01_fotor

I encourage a look at the full paper linked above. (This link is to my summary)  Disclosure: I provided input).

When you look at all these areas, and the much more detailed descriptions in the full paper, I would suggest you realize how far we are from meeting the needs, and therefore how inappropriate it is to force people to stay alive and suffer needlessly.  At least in the enlightened states we understand this with respect to being pain free.  How about for the other needs?

P.S.  The importance of this issue is highlighted from this study from Canada, as reported in the Washington Post, finding that the majority of those who wanted to end their lives medically were driven by psychological suffering, rather than physical suffering.

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What To Expect From Death Itself, and Opportunities for Patient Partnering

I remember vividly, from when my sister was dying back in 1997 in the second hospice in the world (link to my parents’ book full text),  how important it was to my mother that when asked what she feared most, she was able to say “the death rattle” and that Dr. Robert Twycross was able to reassure her both of the insignificance of the sound, and that he would in any event make sure that it did not occur.

So, I found a new article by Doctor Sara Manning Peskin in the New York Times particularly powerful and empowering. Under the headline The Symptoms of Dying, Dr Peskin first points out that as the “letting go” gets closer, deaths become more and more similar.

You and I, one day we’ll die from the same thing. We’ll call it different names: cancer, diabetes, heart failure, stroke.

One organ will fail, then another. Or maybe all at once. We’ll become more similar to each other than to people who continue living with your original diagnosis or mine.

Dying has its own biology and symptoms. It’s a diagnosis in itself. While the weeks and days leading up to death can vary from person to person, the hours before death are similar across the vast majority of human afflictions.

Some symptoms, like the death rattle, air hunger and terminal agitation, appear agonizing, but aren’t usually uncomfortable for the dying person. They are well-treated with medications. With hospice availability increasing worldwide, it is rare to die in pain.

And, PLEASE PLEASE, note that last sentence.  Only a couple of days ago, at dinner at our retirement community, it turned out that several of our friends, informed, educated, with great access to services, still had no confidence that they would have a “good death.”

The article  (which is the first of two) then goes on to outline those various stages and symptoms the body may face: The Death Rattle, Air Hunger, and (the wrongly named) Terminal Agitation, and how they are addressed.

I guess the reason I find this relevant to patient partnering is that I think it is really important for anybody facing serious illness to be given information about all of this as soon as possible.  Having that on the table — or at least the general reassurance that it can all be managed when the time comes, will just make it far easier for an honest cooperative partnering discussion about whatever else needs to be engaged.  My guess is that most of those providing care will also become more relaxed when they know that patient and family want to know what will happen, and are willing to share their worries and have them addressed.

NQF Advanced Illness Care Strategies Webinar On March 15

The National Quality Forum Issue Brief, Strategies for Change – A Collaborative Journey to Transform Advanced Illness Care, which was issued late last year after work involving a large Action Team, brings together six different areas of need and discusses the relationships between these six areas of need and their components.  It is a major advance in expanding understanding that those facing serious illness have to deal with far more than the pain/consciousness choice and the quality/quantity choice, they also have to engage with all kind of other pressures, many of which have in the past hardly been dealt with by the health care system.  This is not just about end of life, but about all those facing serious health centered challenges.  I discussed the Brief in some detail here. (Disclosure: I provided some input and help NQF with presentations about the ideas, doing so from a patient partnering point of view.)

The areas are well shown in this chart:

advanced-illness-care-graphic-1016-01_fotor

Just looking at the list will convince you that any solution that fails to address all of these areas can not be said to be person-centered, because it is at best centered on only apart of the person, rather than all of them.Moreover, failure to address any of the six will obviously undercut all of the six, not just the one explicitly not covered.

The next step in making the vision behind the Brief a reality is a March 15 webinar.  This webinar (sign-up information below) will delve into case studies which demonstrate how physicians, nursing homes, home health agencies and others can integrate the preferences in this chart into existing quality efforts.

For some, hearing about these examples may be much more practical and realistic a way of thinking about moving forward than the more analytic approach in the paper.  Others may find the combination of examples and analysis the most empowering of all.  Indeed, the Brief itself does include some brief “snapshots,” examples of innovation in practice.

As the Issue Brief concludes:

Building on the movement towards person- centered advanced illness care, the time is now to bridge medical care, social services, and community assistance to form a stronger support network for individuals with advanced illness and their families and caregivers.

The webinar it a great place to start plugging in to this network.  You can register for the Webinar here.  Not to be missed.

 

 

Do We Need Specialists Within Specialties Focused On Particular Life Goals For Those Dealing With Serious Illnesses?

Here is an idea.

Particularly with long term diseases, the treatments chosen and needed may well very significantly by values and life choices.  For example, there is the dimension of pain versus awareness and communication capacity.  There is the dimension of quality of life versus quantity of life.

Moreover, as we get to understand the choices we have to make, the question of what would provide quality starts to become more and more nuanced, regardless indeed of where they put themselves on the quality/quantity continuum.

For example, for one one person it might mean staying physically active for a long time.  For another it might mean being mentally active.  For another staying emotionally connected.  For yet another being productive (getting things finished.)  For another it might mean being happy.

As of now, those specializing in serious diseases are better and better at finding our what people want.  And specific disease experts are getting better and better at treating particular problems.

But since some people with, for example, a potentially painful cancer care most about staying active physically, and others about being intellectually productive, maybe they need different treatments, and perhaps, as the science develops, different experts with different knowledge and connection to emerging research.  (To a certain extent, the development of an expertise in palliative care is a recognition of these insights, although to the general public, that is generally associated with pain, rather than other goals.)

Similarly, for one person with Parkinson’s, the goal might be to be able to keep writing.  For another it might be keeping out of pain.  Again not only might the treatment need to  be different, but so ultimately might be the needed expertise.

I realize that creating such new kinds of specialists runs the risk of an ever greater fragmentation of care.  But surely the right way to think of this is to realize that as the risk of fragmentation becomes greater — as it will in any event — the need for coordination, navigation, management, and communication becomes greater.  That problem has to be solved anyway.

Moreover, at the risk of restating the obvious, the patient partner team approach helps guarantee that the patient articulates and communicates what they want — and then gets it.

 

NQF “Strategies for Change – A Collaborative Journey to Transform Advanced Illness Care” Released

Today the National Quality Forum released its Strategies for Change – A Collaborative Journey to Transform Advanced Illness Care. As the announcement says:

NQP’s Advanced Illness Care Action Team, which includes 25 patients, care providers, physicians, nurses, spiritual advisors, and other experts from the public and private sectors, developed the issue brief. More than two dozen individuals and organizations that are leading robust initiatives to transform advanced illness care in the United States also provided input.

It is is a very rich document, with many insights and resources.  Rather than attempt to summarize it, I will instead list the lessons that I took from both the document and my participation as a patient voice in the process of bringing its ideas together.

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Should There Be a New Medical Role to Fill the Gap Between Specialists and PCPs for Those With Ongoing Serious Illness?

My doctors, nurses and primary care doctor are wonderful.

But I realize that I am asking them to do something impossible, to help with the day to day challenges to my body that may not be a direct part of my bone marrow cancer, but are deeply interrelated with it, with each providing the context for the other.

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