Politico Article on “Crisis” Facing Hospice Highlights Growth of Inpatient Hospice Deaths

A recent article in Politico under the provocative title Hospice in Crisis makes the case that changes in family structure, improved life expectancy, technology and expectations are creating problems for the hospice movement because the rigidity of the reimbursement system does not allow for flexible responses.  In particular, the article points to the increased recognition of the need for in-patient hospice care:

Some experts see promise in using more inpatient care, whether in a freestanding “hospice house”—a more formal and regulated setting for care—or a section of hospital or nursing home. Hospice houses are more common than they were 20 years ago, but they are still not the norm. By 2015, the proportion of deaths in America that took place under inpatient hospice care rose to 8 percent, from zero in 1999, according to research recently published in Health Affairs. With soup on the stove, cookie dough in the fridge, and places for those who do have family and friends to gather, such houses don’t feel institutional. Mostly they’re used for a brief stay to control a crisis, or for a few days of respite care for family caregivers. But some who have studied hospice extensively, like Elizabeth Bradley, a health policy expert who recently became president of Vassar College, say it’s worth thinking about how this inpatient setting can take on a bigger role, at least toward the end. “It makes a lot of sense,” she said. “It’s not home—but it’s homelike. And it’s set up to pass you through the end of life.”

For those unfamiliar with the minutiae of the payment structure, while the Medicare system does allow for higher payments for inpatient hospice, availability is strictly controlled, with a percentage of days cap, and situation eligibility requirements.

Personally, having seen the physical strain that the end-of-life process puts on family caregiving networks (if they even exist), I believe that in patient hospice should be much more readily available.

Nor do I accept the argument that because almost everyone says they want to die at home, this is the end of the matter.  I believe that many say this because they feel that being at home means that they will be back in control.  But that is as much a comment on the lack of control that patients feel and fear in hospital than the desire for home as a specific place.

Once we design inpatient hospice that gives control to the patient, I suspect that many more will choose that option.

 

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