Wrap Around Care and Right to Choose

A lovely NYT article by Jessica Nutik Zitter, headed Should I Help My Patients Die? gives a whole new, to me at least, perspective on the relationship between comprehensive care and end of life choice.  As a palliative care doctor in  state that allows, with multiple protections, assistance in the end of life process, she tells of this referral:

This first patient of mine was not a simple case. When I walked into his room, he glared at me. “Are you here to help me with this aid-in-dying thing?” he asked. He was in his early 60s, thin and tired, but in no obvious distress. From my read of his chart, he met all criteria to qualify. Terminal illness, decision-making capacity, ability to self-administer the medications. And he had made the requisite first request for the drugs two weeks earlier, as procedure dictates.

When I asked why he wanted to end his life early, he shrugged. “I’m just sick of living.” I asked about any symptoms that might lie behind his request: unrelenting pain, nausea, shortness of breath. He denied them all. In palliative care, we are taught that suffering can take many forms besides the physical. I probed further and the floodgates opened.

He felt abandoned by his sister. She cared only about his Social Security payments, he said, and had gone AWOL now that the checks were being mailed to her house. Their love-hate relationship spanned decades, and they were now on the outs. His despair had given way to rage.

“Let’s just end this,” he said. “I’m fed up with my lousy life.” He really didn’t care, he added, that his sister opposed his decision.

His request appeared to stem from a deep family wound, not his terminal illness. I felt he wanted to punish his sister, and he had found a way to do it.

At our second meeting, with more trust established, he issued a sob, almost a keening. He felt terrified and powerless, he said. He didn’t want to live this way anymore.

I understood. I could imagine my own distress in his condition — being shuttled like a bag of bones between the nursing home and the hospital. It was his legal right to request this intervention from me. But given how uncomfortable I was feeling, was it my right to say no?

In the end, the patient agrees to try an anti-depressant, and dies three moths later in a nursing home.

But the real reasons for the patient’s despair are not medical, not pain, but psychosocial and emotional, with strong legal and financial elements.  These were needs that the system, notwithstanding our growing understanding of the need for multi-faceted comprehensive care, is just not yet able to provide.

This leads me to want to put the question much more starkly:

Do we have the right to force people so stay alive when we are unable to give them what thy need to have hope and meaning in their lives?

In terms of our understanding what the above described patient needs, take a look at this graphic from the recent NQF document, Strategies for Change – A Collaborative Journey to Transform Advanced Illness Care

advanced-illness-care-graphic-1016-01_fotor

I encourage a look at the full paper linked above. (This link is to my summary)  Disclosure: I provided input).

When you look at all these areas, and the much more detailed descriptions in the full paper, I would suggest you realize how far we are from meeting the needs, and therefore how inappropriate it is to force people to stay alive and suffer needlessly.  At least in the enlightened states we understand this with respect to being pain free.  How about for the other needs?

P.S.  The importance of this issue is highlighted from this study from Canada, as reported in the Washington Post, finding that the majority of those who wanted to end their lives medically were driven by psychological suffering, rather than physical suffering.

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One thought on “Wrap Around Care and Right to Choose

  1. Good post, Richard. Thanks.

    On Sun, Aug 6, 2017 at 12:31 PM, Patient Partnering Blog wrote:

    > richardzorza posted: “A lovely NYT article by Jessica Nutik Zitter, > headed Should I Help My Patients Die? gives a whole new, to me at least, > perspective on the relationship between comprehensive care and end of life > choice. As a palliative care doctor in state that allows, w” >

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