Damage Done By Bad Relationships Between Care Team and Patient — Partnering Lessons

A recent Israeli study of NICU rudeness by parents toward staff, reported in the New York Times, found:

[E]ven [ ] mild unpleasantness was enough to affect doctors’ and nurses’ medical skills. Individual performance and teamwork deteriorated to the point where diagnostic skills, procedural skills and team communication were impaired and medical errors were more likely, compared to control scenarios in which the mother would just say something general about being worried. The team’s ability to perform in critical medical situations with sick babies was affected for the rest of the day, the findings suggest.

and, as with a study focused on unpleasantness from medical staff:

Both studies were done in Israel, but the impact of rudeness does not seem to be culturally bound, a concern that was raised in the initial study design. “Israelis are not deemed to be the most polite people in the world; they say what’s on their mind,” Dr. Bamberger said. “The evidence suggests that even in a somewhat rude society, it still has an effect.”

I doubt that very few of us, when we are even a bit brittle with our caregiving team, realize that we may be impacting not only our own care, but those of others (who may indeed respond with additional rudeness.

It turns out that one approach to minimizing he effect on the care team is to provide training to raise the response threshold, such as by showing and categorizing pictures of angry faces.

To my mind, one of the great benefits of a patient partnering approach is that by humanizing patients and the team to each other, it makes it much less likely that rudeness or insensitivity will escalate.  Rather, the recipients will put the behavior in context, understand the overall situation and history, and respond in a lower key way.

Best of all, maybe folks will learn to use this as learning opportunities, making themselves vulnerable, and ultimately increasing their ability to partner.

It would be nice to think about how to change the intake and patient team process to acknowledge the stresses, and to create a culture in which honesty is requested and appreciated.  I suspect that much rudeness is rooted in powerlessness and fear that any serious attempt to obtain an improvement will be rebuffed.

As the Times article concludes:

But it’s critical for the members of the medical team to be aware of the risk and to acknowledge the problem, Dr. Riskin said, in order to help protect one another and deliver optimal care.

“We are human beings; we are affected by rudeness.”

 

 

Advertisements